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Enablement of High-Temperature Well Drilling for Multilateral Closed-Loop Geothermal Systems

Constructing a multilateral closed-loop geothermal system (MCLGS) requires directional tools and magnetic ranging tools in the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) to drill and intersect the wellbores and create the closed loop. The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of such an MCLGS is largely driven by rock temperature – the hotter the rock, the more energy that is produced from a given well configuration, and the lower the levelized cost. However, these tools have a maximum temperature limit above which they are no longer functional. To enable drilling of high-temperature rock formations and thereby decrease the LCOE, methods for estimating the temperature of the BHA critical components are required. To simulate drilling, two models of increasing complexity were developed. The first model is a one-dimensional pseudo steady state wellbore + thermal resistance model capable of estimating the temperature and pressure profile of the drilling mud throughout the drill pipe and annulus. This model allows for the understanding of key performance drivers and technology requirements to achieve high-temperature drilling.

Eavor-Loop™ Dispatchability Case Study for PPA with Utility

Eavor-Loop™, a multilateral closed loop geothermal system, is a clean firm power generation technology that can be scaled to phase out fossil fuel baseload and peaker plant generation. Eavor has partnered with a major US utility for the large-scale development of Eavor-Loops to supply clean firm power to the grid. The favorable geothermal gradients in the region, coupled with the scalability of the Eavor-Loop™ solution, indicate that there is >1.2GW of potential Eavor-Loop™ generation on the selected project licence area located in southwestern USA.

The Role of Clean Firm Power Generation in a 2050 Net-Zero Electricity Grid

Utility solar and wind generation play a large role in the pathways to a 24/7 carbon free energy future, especially considering that these resources are (and likely will remain for the coming decades) the least expensive form of electricity generation. While they are a central part of the mix, wind and solar alone will be insufficient. The intermittent nature of wind and solar, combined with their increased adoption in the grid, will create resiliency challenges towards meeting energy demand hour-by-hour, year over year.

Joint Development Between Eavor and Turboden

Eavor’s proprietary geothermal power technology consists of two vertical wells connected by one or more passes designed to circulate a working fluid in a closed loop system, with no interaction with the underground formation water, to supply heat at the surface.
Turboden Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) Technology converts the heat available at the surface into electricity by means of a closed thermodynamic process involving a suitable working fluid which is heated up in a heat exchanger and expanded in a turbine to generate electricity.

Multilateral Closed-Loop Geothermal Systems as a Zero Emission Load-Following Resource

The Eavor-Loop™, a multilateral closed loop geothermal system (MCLGS), is introduced as a zero-emission load-following resource (ZELFR) that is globally scalable and can provide baseload or dispatchable electricity…

Eavor-Lite Performance Update and Extrapolation to Commercial Projects

Eavor-Lite™ is a full-scale demonstration project of a multilateral closed-loop geothermal system. An update is presented based on ~16 months of operations and testing. The project is located near Sylvan Lake, Alberta, Canada and consists of two 1.7 km long multilateral horizontal wellbores connecting two 2.4 km deep vertical wellbores to create a U-tube shaped closed-loop geothermal system.

Subsurface Characterization Methods for Multilateral Closed Loop Geothermal Systems

The production of heat and electricity from geothermal energy is an old concept and has been around since the early 1900’s. However, many geothermal projects are plagued by high up-front exploration costs, financing difficulties and geological risk of low permeability reservoirs which limits development past the exploration phase.

Case Study of a Multilateral Closed-Loop Geothermal System

Results from a full-scale demonstration project of a multilateral closed-loop geothermal system are presented. The project is located near Sylvan Lake, Alberta, Canada and consists of two 2.5 km long multilateral horizontal wellbores connecting two 2.4 km deep vertical wellbores to create a U-tube shaped closed-loop geothermal system.

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